PUBLIC LIFE

Democracy is a system where tables turn. I have spent 16 years in opposition and 15 in government. I have never abandoned my party or our voters, nor have I traded politics for business opportunities. Defeats are there to learn from them and do better the next time around. After the defeat in 2002 we organized the largest civic network in the country and united centre right voters like never before.

1988

From a group of friends fighting communism to a two-thirds majority in Parliament. An extraordinary journey.

1989

I sweat blood reading Locke and Hegel’s philosophical writings on civil society in English. This is when I met professor Norman Stone, who encouraged me saying: these are difficult things, but they will make sense.

1989

Not so long ago. Standing up for freedom is not a choice. Hungarians have a long history of standing up to their oppressors, no matter the odds.

1989

We need to right the wrongs of the past. We need to understand and tell future generations what really happened and why. History written by the communists is not the real history of Hungary.

1990

Hungary has no future if good men do not take responsibility and do not carry the burden. József Antall will always be remembered as the prime minister who took on an incredible challenge and made history as the first democratically elected Hungarian prime minister after communism.

1991

When we were a bit younger with now MEP Tamás Deutsch.

1992

Fidesz's support grew steadily and established itself as governing alternative.

1993

In 1993, the fifth Fidesz congress introduced reforms to the party organization, and I was elected president of the party for the first time.

1994

Fourth year in parliament. After József Antall’s death and only four years after the fall of communism, the post-communist Socialist party had returned to power, with the formerly anti-communist liberal party enabling their restoration both domestically and internationally.

1995

By 1995, Fidesz was destined to fill a void in the opposition. The return of the former communists to power, as well as the liberal party providing them with moral legitimacy and parliamentary support completely reorganized Hungary’s political landscape.

1996

In 1996, Fidesz published its memorandum For a Civic Hungary that presented our vision for Hungary and served as the basis for uniting the Hungarian right.

1997

In the second half of the nineties, uniting right-wing political forces was a major priority for Fidesz. Agreements with MDF and KDNP were finally struck in 1997, just in time for the upcoming general elections in the following year.

1998

Fidesz led the anti-communist opposition and became the primary contender in the 1998 general elections. As prime minister candidate I debated Prime Minister Gyula Horn.

1998

In 1998, Fidesz became the second-largest party in Hungary and defeated the Socialists and liberals, forming a coalition government with the Hungarian Democratic Forum (MDF) and the Independent Smallholders' Party (FKGP) to help restore the middle class and rural Hungary.

1999

Joining NATO was the first major step in our path to transatlantic integration and securing Hungary’s place in the free world.

2000

In 2000, on the invitation of former Chancellor Helmut Kohl, Fidesz joined the European People’s Party, the home of Christian-democratic political parties.

2001

One of our early successes: building bridges in Europe. Literally. The Mária Valéria bridge not only connects Hungary and Slovakia, it reconnects Hungarians living on the two sides of the Danube River.

2002

After negotiating Hungary’s accession to the EU during my four-year term as prime minister, the former communists came back to power. I was determined to keep Hungary on the path of EU-integration. That day finally came on May 1st, 2004.

2003

Strength through unity: in 2003, Fidesz formed an alliance to integrate all center-right voters.

2004

Winning the first European elections in Hungary. Back then, we couldn’t imagine we would go on to win every subsequent European Parliamentary election in Hungary.

2005

After our EU integration, it was time to heal wounds and unite Hungarians beyond our borders. We thus supported the referendum on dual citizenship. Despite the socialist-liberal government’s anti-Hungarian campaign, the majority of Hungarians chose unity. The Left delayed dual citizenship as long as they could, until we won the election again in 2010.

2006

On an audio recording that was leaked to the public, the Socialist prime minister admitted to lying in order to win reelection. The moral crisis that followed shook Hungary to its core. Protests lasted throughout the 50th anniversary of the 1956 Revolution, with the communist-liberal government re-enacting the Soviet bloodbath of 1956. After police charged at peaceful protesters, women and elderly were seen fleeing, covered in blood. Sixteen years after the transition to democracy, two years after EU-accession, the Left showed their true face once again. Meanwhile, leaders in western capitals remained silent. At the municipal elections that followed, Fidesz won in a landslide.

2006

Hungary did not inherit freedom or rule of law. We made it happen. Socialists and liberals blockading the Parliament from the people was more than symbolic. The return of the socialists to power should remind us all: Freedom can never be taken for granted.

2007

In 2007, we have successfully initiated a referendum that eventually reversed major decisions of the socialist-liberal government regarding healthcare and education.

2008

The existing moral crisis was deepened by the 2008 crash that exposed the economic mismanagement of the Socialist government. The failure of the markets to regulate themselves, the failure of the government to protect the livelihoods of Hungarians and the crushing burden imposed by the EU-IMF bailout were the final nails in the coffin of 20 years of failed transition to democracy and free-market policies. [Poster: “The Gyurcsány-Bajnai alliance has wrecked the country”]

2009

As the Left’s collapse grew imminent, racial hatred and extremism soared. Murders of Roma citizens increased tensions at the local and national level. The far-right profited.

2010

Political, economic and moral corruption devastated Hungary, which paved the way for a revolution in the voting booths. Hungarians entrusted Fidesz and KDNP with a two-thirds majority to rebuild the country. Eight years of liberal-communist madness came to an end.

2010

Corrupt leftist governance not only left Hungary in ruins, it literally flooded several villages with toxic sludge. Hungary’s largest industrial disaster in decades left innocent citizens dead. Rebuilding these villages and their residents’ livelihoods was symbolic of the task we had to accomplish on a national level.

2011

The first Hungarian presidency of the Council of the European Union. The goal has not changed: We want a “Strong Europe.”

2012

Democratic transition could not be complete with the patchwork constitution that was left over from 1949. The Fundamental Law replaced post-communist structures and institutions, laying down the foundation of a modern Hungary that is proud, sovereign and prosperous. We seek to build our nation based on our heritage and Christian values.

2013

Uniting Hungarians after the Treaty of Trianon was a moral obligation that was long overdue. I salute every "new" Hungarian. One nation, one heart.

2013

Helping local communities with a historic act: alleviating all accumulated debt of the country’s municipalities. The state took over all debt obligations, paving the way for major local development projects under the Modern Cities Program.

2013

Allowing thousands of families to escape foreign-currency mortgage traps and soaring interest rates was indispensable to allowing Hungarians to recover financially. Shortly after this, we also put a stop to ever-increasing household energy prices and enacted significant price cuts.

2014

After four years of crisis management, passing a new constitution and putting families first, Fidesz was reelected and maintained its two-thirds majority in Parliament.

2015

2015 was the year terrorism, mass migration and human trafficking shook all of Europe. Defending the Hungarian and EU border led to an inexplicable and unimaginable division that is present in Europe to this very day.

2016

Investments in sports and football finally paid off. In 2016, after 44 years, the Hungarian national team qualified for Euro 2016. And again in 2021.

2017

Sports are more than games, business or entertainment. They build character. As a professional football player, I learned the value of team spirit, discipline and hard work. The FINA 2017 World Championship was just one of several major international sports events hosted by Hungary.

2018

Several hard borders, including Hungary’s, stand in the way of migrants on the Balkan route. Brussels elites want to let illegal migrants in, while Hungarians choose law and order. Five years and several defeats later, EU quota plans are still being pursued against the will of the majority of Europeans. Common sense will prevail. Voters supported our hard stance on illegal immigration and the Fidesz-KDNP alliance was reelected with a third consecutive two-thirds majority.

2019

By 2019, before the coronavirus hit Europe, Hungarian economic growth was among the top in EU, employment levels reached an all-time high for both men and women, and public debt was gradually decreasing. Fidesz won the European elections with a landslide victory.

2019

To tackle demographic decline, our first major pro-family measures were introduced in 2010. Families with more kids pay less taxes. In ten years, we have built a robust family support system, brick by brick. The institution of marriage, as a union between a man and a woman, also enjoys legal protection at the highest level.

2020

In November 2020, Orbán Viktor surpassed Tisza Kálmán as the longest serving prime minister in Hungary’s history.

2020

Europe is a common project. No matter the challenges, we must compromise. Sometimes it’s easy, sometimes it’s very hard. The 2021-2027 European budget required an extraordinarily difficult compromise.

2021

With the COVID-19 pandemic, Hungary is facing its third international crisis in a decade. We have learned from the past: The Left went with austerity, higher taxes and bank bailouts. We are taking the opposite path: more family benefits, lower taxes, moratorium on loan repayments, and incentives for investments.

1988
1989
1989
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2010
2011
2012
2013
2013
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2019
2020
2020
2021
“The life of a leader is not much complicated. In the first 30 years it’s about learning, the second 30 it’s about earning, and the last 30 is about returning.”
Political credo
Orbán Viktor

The Leader

Failing in one’s mission may be heroic, but there is no joy in it. Fulfilling a mission, while guiding one’s country to success, freedom and prosperity is no less heroic; and it is also a source of joy.

tap on the cards to learn more

The Freedom fighter

Orbán Viktor was born and raised in a communist dictatorship and it came naturally to many in his generation that they will not just stand by and watch. He was the one who publicly demanded that the Soviet troops leave the country. Nothing has changed since then. Freedom, independence and national sovereignty remain values held dear to Fidesz.

The Opposition leader

After the defeat of the communist regime, Orbán Viktor and the Fidesz party set out to defeat the remnants of the socialist forces in democratic elections. Fidesz had to create the concept of a national Hungary, and set its foundations, one step at a time, which eventually led to the two-third majority in parliament in 2010.

The Party leader

After a defeat in 2002, he organized the largest civic network in the country and united centre right voters. With Fidesz, he has built a true people’s party that enjoys the largest support in all sections of the electorate. Between 2002 and 2012, he was vice president of the European People’s Party. In 2001, he was appointed vice president of Centrist Democrat International.

Crisis manager

When dealing with the economic crisis in 2009, the political, economic and moral crisis caused by the left in 2010, or the migration crisis in 2015 and the Covid-19 pandemic, Orbán Viktor always put the interest of Hungarian families first. Trying circumstances and solving them have become the trademark of his governments.

Learn more

Get more information on contemporary politics in Hungary by visiting the official site of governing party Fidesz.

fidesz.hu

Ten years of progress

With overwhelming popular support, in 2010, a new, national system was born in Hungary, based on Hungarian traditions, Hungarian families and the work of the Hungarian people.

Hungary